The Greensboro Review, Issue 103, Spring 2018

Dedicated to the memory of Jim Clark, longtime editor of The Greensboro Review, with an Editor’s Note from Terry L. Kennedy. Featuring the Robert Watson Literary Prize-winning story, Don’t Know Tough, by Eli Cranor, the Robert Watson Literary Prize-winning poem, from The Book of Revelation, by Alison Powell, as well as new work from Cathy Carlisi, Karen Harryman, Charlotte Matthews, Ben Nickol, Carolyn Oliver, Doug Ramspeck, Natalie Serber, Adam Vines, David Welch, John Sibley Williams, and more.

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The Greensboro Review, Issue 102, Fall 2017

Featuring a final Editor’s Note by Jim Clark,  the Amon Liner Poetry Award-wining poem, In the Hummingbird Exhibit at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, by Katy Murphy, as well as new work from Danielle Badra, Adrian Blevins, George David Clark, David Crouse, Nausheen Eusuf, Paul Guest, Becky Hagenstone, Jackson Holbert, Jessica Jacobs, Luke Johnson, James A. Jordan, Rose Lambert-Sluder, Shireen Madon, Emilia Phillips, Michael Pontacoloni, David Rigsbee, F. Daniel Rzicnek, Shane Seely, and David Stevens.

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The Greensboro Review, Issue 101, Spring 2017

Featuring the Robert Watson Literary Prize-winning story, The Dybbuk, by Cady Vishniac, the Robert Watson Literary Prize-winning poem, Alma Redemptoris Mater, by Kelly Michels, as well as new work from Andrew Bode-Lang, Susanna Brougham, John Randolph Carter, Leila Chatti, Susan Cohen, Mary Louise Kiernan Hagerdon, A. Van Jordan, David Koehn, Victoria Kornick, Michael Leibowitz, Christopher Louvet, Max McDonough, Jed Myers, Tanner Pruitt, Kevn Rabas, Tori Reynolds, Jada Yee, and more.

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May 1966

Volume 1, Number 1

The journal’s inaugural issue featured work from students in the first years of the MFA Writing Program at Greensboro, including Kelly Cherry, Harry Humes, Thomas W. Molyneux, and Angela Davis. Students and faculty members printed the issue in the campus duplicating shop, then collated it by hand. Greensboro painter Betty Watson designed the logo that is still in use today.

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